The Tiny House Movement is a description for the architectural and social movement that advocates living simply in small homes. Generally, homes less than 400 square feet are considered "tiny." Many people are rediscovering the benefits of "tiny living" including efficiency, sustainability (many are designed to function "off the grid"), and financial freedom.   Without the burden of a mortgage, or a large space to clean and maintain, owners can focus more on relationships with their families and communities.

A tiny house is based on these three principles:

  1. It focuses on effective use of space.
  2. It relies on good design to meet the needs of the residents.
  3. It serves as a vehicle to a lifestyle that the resident wishes to pursue. 

In Ryan Mitchell's book Tiny House Living, he describes tiny living as

"the size of the space relative to the number of people living in it.  This means a single person living in 200 square feet and families of 5 living in 1200 square feet are both living in tiny houses.  Both homes require the residents to be intentional about the space they live in, including how they design and arrange it, and how they use the house as a vehicle to live the life they wish to live.  A tiny house is not just a home--it is a lifestyle."

A tiny house can either be on a solid foundation, or on wheels, depending on the needs and resources of the residents.  From there, the form can be quite varied.  They can look like anything from miniature Victorians, to log cabins, to uber-modern structures. They can be built from scratch, into an existing building, from pre-fab kits, out of modified shipping containers, etc.  The possibilities are endless.  Scroll down for some tiny-house inspiration.

Read more on the blog about how we decided to have our own tiny house custom built.